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An American’s Vision Healed – in India
            By Shlomo Maital

Kristos Stavropoulos
Kristos Stavropoulos is Chief Information & Technology Officer at Maguire Investments.  The only reason I mention this, is that I assume he has the resources to get top-flight medical care anywhere in the US. 
   Instead he went to … India.
   India?
   Stavropoulos recounts that he had a corneal scar – a scar on the thin transparent layer that covers the iris and pupil of the eye and refracts light.   A scar on the cornea can be a major problem.  Caused by an eye infection, the scar affected his vision – rather crucial in his line of work.  So he travelled all the way to Hyderabad, in southern India, to the L V Prasad Eye Institute.    (I have visited LVPEI several times, and recently met with its amazing founder, Dr. G. N. Rao,  in Israel).  
    At LVPEI   Stavropoulos consulted Dr. Sayan Basu.  She is an expert in a highly complex and revolutionary treatment, that uses stem cells to regrow and repair corneas.  Stem cells are human cells that have the ability to become whatever is needed – include corneal tissue – depending where they are.  But they are notoriously difficult to work with.   Here is what Stavropoulos said, after successful treatment:
     “My experience at LVPEI has been exceptional.  When you think of surgery, it’s scary, especially with eyes.  But the great thing about this institute is the positivity and expertise  that the doctors and the team have.  Most importantly, I trusted Dr. Basu and was assured about the success of the treatment that I was provided.”
    So far, over 1,600 innovative stem cell procedures have been performed at LVPEI, Patients from India, and from all over the world, have benefited from these innovative procedures.  At LVPEI,  wealthy patients pay for patients who have no money.  But everybody, EVERYbody, gets the same quality of medical care.  And the enormous scale of the medical care means that even experimental high-tech procedures can be tried, improved, studied – and made standard.
      At LVPEI I learned about an even more amazing technology under development – use of stem cells to regrow RETINAL cells (the retina is the kind of mirror, or light receptor, at the back of the eye, subject to retinal detachment, or macular degeneration [e.g. holes in the retina] ). 
    So, if you have eye disease, and if your doctors tell you they can’t treat it – check out LVPEI.   Because Indian people have so many eye diseases and problems,  LVPEI experts have vast experience – and creativity plus experience leads to innovative medical care that pushes frontiers to amazing places.  In the past 31 years, LVPEI has treated 28 million people, many of them from very poor villages. 
     By the way, Dr. Rao is now working to establish an LVPEI-type clinic in Monrovia, Liberia.  This,  despite Liberia’s strong links with the United States (it was founded by former American slaves).  It is hard for even top American doctors to understand how to establish medical care centers in very poor countries – but LVPEI knows how.  Liberia’s legendary former president Ellen Johnson Sirleaf,  who heard of LVPEI and whose close relative was successfully treated there, visited LVPEI, made the request – and LVPEI responded.
      

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Rescue Dogs – Rescue Children
By Shlomo Maital 

Seven years ago, our daughter in law came upon a puppy in Tel Aviv. A mixed-breed Yorkshire,  the four-month-old puppy jumped on her, on a Tel Aviv Street.  Dafna could find no owner, and brought her home, bathed her, cleaned her up (she was full of fleas and ticks), took her to the vet for shots…and asked us if we could help find her a home, as a rescue dog.   I met Pixie (the name we gave her) when I came home from a working trip to Europe.  As I came in the door, she jumped into my arms and licked my face… instant love, after 3 microseconds.  At that instant, my wife and I decided we would keep her.  Since then Pixie has made us laugh every single morning and with her antics, made the awful news in the New York Times and Ha’aretz bearable.   
     Pixie IS a rescue dog.  She rescued us, in a sense.  She takes us for walks and offers unconditional love, rain or shine – and an incredible greeting every time we come home, as if we were long-lost siblings.
    Several of our friends have rescue dogs, too.   One has a beautiful placid huge golden retriever, female,  she (the dog) carries herself with dignity worthy of Pope Francis.    Taking home a rescue dog is truly worthwhile and meaningful —  often, it keeps the dog from being put down, in rescue kennels that are vastly overcrowded, because so many unworthy people bring home puppies for children and then suddenly discover dogs need care, feeding and walking ..and abandon them. 
     So yes – great that we love rescue dogs.
     But what about rescue kids?  Writing in The New York Times, Nicholas Kristof points out that America is neglecting kids – and not just those of immigrants. 
“It’s not just the kids at the border.  America systematically shortchanges tens of millions of children, including homegrown kids. The upshot is that American kids are more likely to be poor, to drop out of high school and even to die young than in other advanced countries.”
    So —  What about a program for rescue kids?   Resources for education, food. (Republicans now seek to cut a food stamp program that has fed millions – including one child in five who lives in poverty in America,  a Third World statistic).   Even, perhaps, adoption, when justified. 
   Kids are as lovable as dogs. And they deserve just as much love.

p.s. this is blog # 1,500.  Thanks to all my readers. 

Blog entries written by Prof. Shlomo Maital

Shlomo Maital
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